Category Archives: Reviews

That’s A Wrap: Beyonce at the BFI, Joan Collins, Doctor Strange and more

On this week’s That’s A Wrap podcast with me and Angie Greaves we’re discussing a Beyonce symposium being held by the British Film Institute.

Plus. is Bey getting back together with Kelly and Michelle for a Destiny’s Child reunion? Joan Collins returns to the big screen, what links British actor Toby Jones to Justin Timberlake and my thoughts on Marvel’s latest, Doctor Strange.

Continue reading That’s A Wrap: Beyonce at the BFI, Joan Collins, Doctor Strange and more

Advertisements

That’s A Wrap: The Jackson Five, Benedict Cumberbatch, Trolls

The latest edition of That’s A Wrap from Angie Greaves and I is literally bursting with the best entertainment news.

From The Jackson Five’s new book to a new Lando Calrissian, from my review of Trolls to Benedict Cumberbatch’s SNL gig, and from Ryan Lochte’s film debut to Lionel Richie’s scented candles, we’ve got you covered.

Continue reading That’s A Wrap: The Jackson Five, Benedict Cumberbatch, Trolls

That’s A Wrap: Kylie Minogue, Fantastic Beasts, Paddington 2

Angie Greaves and I are back with another edition of our entertainment news podcast, That’s A Wrap.

This week we’re discussing everything from Elton John’s autobiography to Kylie Minogue’s new film plus an update on Paddington 2 and my thoughts on the new Netflix comedy, Mascots.

Continue reading That’s A Wrap: Kylie Minogue, Fantastic Beasts, Paddington 2

That’s A Wrap! – Tom Cruise, Beyonce and Jay-Z, Olympians’ books and more

Angie Greaves and I are back once again with all our showbiz news in a brand new podcast.

And now we have an official title: That’s A Wrap!

This week we’re covering everything from Tom Cruise to Beyonce and Jay-Z to the forthcoming Prince memorial concert and new books from some of Team GB’s golden Olympians.

Continue reading That’s A Wrap! – Tom Cruise, Beyonce and Jay-Z, Olympians’ books and more

London Film Festival, Pharrell, Kate Bush, The Entertainer…

Angie Greaves and I are back wth our latest podcast, this week covering a whole host of topics.

I tell Angie my thoughts on Kenneth Branagh’s latest stage outing in The Entertainer, plus there’s what I think you should look out for at this year’s BFI London Film Festival, in music news a new photo exhibition of images of Kate Bush is coming to London and Pharrell Williams is launching his own food range!

There’s also news on Natalie Dormer’s new project, a guest star for How To Get Away With Murder, Angie reveals her secret crush on Graham Norton and much more.

Continue reading London Film Festival, Pharrell, Kate Bush, The Entertainer…

Money Monster, Barack and Michelle, Nicole Kidman and more

This week’s podcast is packed full of news including my thoughts on George Clooney and Julia Roberts in Money Monster, a new film about the Obama’s’ first date, Nicole Kidman working on a vampire movie and what next for Daniel Craig.

Continue reading Money Monster, Barack and Michelle, Nicole Kidman and more

Paddington – film review

IMG_0262.JPG

When I read there were plans for a big screen outing for Paddington Bear I was worried. I grew up watching the BBC’s version of Paddington and I took the little bear to my heart. What if the modern-day CGI version ruined Michael Bond’s creation?

I needn’t have worried. The 21st century version of Paddington is a joy to behold. Director Paul King and producer David Heyman (of Harry Potter fame) have brought the fun and spirit of both the books and the TV series to their film.

The story begins in Darkest Peru where Paddington’s Aunt Lucy and Uncle Pastuzo are discovered by ‘the explorer’. From him they develop a love of the English language (spoken perfectly properly), London and (of course) Marmalade. Cut to 40 years later and Lucy and Pastuzo have adopted their orphaned nephew. Theirs is an idyllic life of marmalade making and dreaming of a trip to London. But when disaster strikes, Lucy decides to move into a home for retired bears and Paddington stows away on a ship to London because, as Aunt Lucy tells him, Londoners “will not have forgotten how to treat a stranger”.

Paddington’s ship finally docks in London (the passage of time is illustrated by how many jars of marmalade he’s eaten) and through a series of events the young bear finds himself at Paddington station where he hopes to make friends and find a new home. Of course this is London and Londoners don’t talk to anyone, except for Mrs Brown who takes pity on Paddington (watch out for the lovely Lost And Found moment) much to the annoyance of her risk assessor husband and daughter Judy, who finds everything so embarrassing.

After supplying her new friend with a name, Mrs Brown offers him a bed for the night and Paddington hopes he’s found his new home. But that may not be the case after he manages to destroy the family’s bathroom almost immediately. After Paddington tells the Browns the story of ‘the explorer’, Mrs Brown sets out to help the young bear to track him down and maybe find his new home. The plot also involves Natural History taxidermist Millicent – Nicole Kidman at her wicked best – who has her own reasons for getting to know Paddington.

The film features a great cast with Hugh Bonneville the human stand out as Mr Brown. I also loved Peter Capaldi’s turn as the Brown’s neighbour Mr Curry who develops something of a crush on Millicent. In fact, one of my few criticisms is that I would have liked to have seen him a bit more! Julie Walters as the Browns’ housekeeper Mrs Bird gets one big scene and there are also cameos from the likes of Matt Lucas, Matt King (Peep Show’s Super Hans) and Jim Broadbent as the kindly Mr Gruber who tells Paddington “a home is more than just a roof over your head”.

But the real star of the show here are the film’s effects. It’s not just the work done on the bear, there are so many scenes that will take your breath away: the jungle in Peru, Paddington’s visit to the Geographers’ Guild archives, even the painted tree on the wall in the Browns’ hallway, the beauty of the effects work is just astonishing, Paddington himself is realised with such care and love – every strand of his fur is visible, the animators have him flying through the air, skateboarding behind a bus and even having a Mission: Impossible moment (complete with theme tune). I truly forgot I was watching a computer generated creature. Ben Whishaw as the voice of Paddington is pitch perfect and I do think he suits the role much better than original choice Colin Firth. The little bear makes you laugh like a drain but also pulls at your heartstrings.

To sum it up, Paddington is a film that the whole family can enjoy. There’s plenty of slapstick for the little ones, laughs for the adults and a message for everyone. As Paddington says “I will never be like other people but that’s ok”. Well the 21st century Paddington is just like the bear we all grew up with. Thank you Paul King and David Heyman for staying true to the bear we all love. Now, when is Paddington 2 out?